Engaging Audiences with Collections via Social Media

blog, presentations

You know best the unique stories your collections have to tell and work hard to preserve those collections for future generations. But how do you take collections care activities from “behind the scenes” to front and center, engaging and educating the public? This was the central question addressed by a four-part series of webinars for small museums and libraries on the topic of collections care outreach. The series was hosted by  Heritage Preservation‘s Connecting to Collections Online Community.

My session focused on the strategic use of social media for outreach related to collections. I talked about how to set goals, select the right  platforms for your  audience, create compelling content, and evaluate success. I showed examples of how organizations can leverage tools such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Tumblr, and Google Hangouts to connect with today’s audiences and engage them in meaningful conversations about collections.

I also suggested the following key questions to consider when developing a social media strategy:

  1. Why are you using social media? What do you hope to achieve?
  2. Who are your target audiences? (Tip: “Everyone” is not a useful audience segment.)
  3. What content can you use to connect with and engage audiences? What existing assets can be repurposed? What new content needs to be created?
  4. What do you want to sound like? (Tip: Try creating a list of contrasting values that illustrate the tonal qualities you want to use as guidelines. For example, “friendly, not cutesy” or “clever, not snarky.”)
  5. What does success mean for you? How might you find evidence of success?

The presentation deck is chock full of great examples from museums and libraries—from the Brooklyn Historical Society to the Shakespeare Library. Take a peek at the slides below or watch the webinar recording on the Connecting to Collections website for the full experience.

Have you seen other great examples of social media being deployed by cultural institutions to connect with audiences about the care and appreciation of collections? Please share in the comments.

 

Vincent Van Gogh Self-Portrait, 1889

“If people can see the images online, will they still come to the museum?”

blog, most requested

During last week’s broadcast of The Kojo Nnamdi Show, art critic Tyler Green referenced a question that’s been floating around museums for nearly two decades: “Well, if people can see the images online, will they need to come to the museum?” It’s okay to groan if you’ve heard this one before. Green’s answer: We’ve seen an increase in attendance since museums have started putting their collections online, therefore these efforts—at least indirectly—have encouraged more people to visit and see art firsthand for themselves. So why won’t this question die?

Some museum types are so tired of this “bad weed” query (I’m looking at you, Richard Urban) that they’ve compiled a list of 18 research studies detailing the connections between online and onsite visitation. Paul Marty (Urban’s colleague at Florida State University) long ago crafted his own curt answer: “Maybe you haven’t heard, but ever since the State of Florida started putting pictures of beaches online, nobody vacations in Florida anymore.”

How do you like to answer this question? What ways do you find most effective for convincing your boss, coworkers, and the people holding the purse strings, that digital efforts are worth our time?

I very much enjoyed listening to passionate articulations from Green and the other guests of the Tech Tuesday broadcast, Peter Dueker (head of digital imaging services at the National Gallery of Art) and Anne Goodyear (co-director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art). Host Marc Fisher lobbed many more skeptical musings their way, some of which I’ve heard before and others that seemed frankly outlandish:

  • Are (high quality) digital images really distortions of the painter’s art? Do they show too much? Do they send the wrong message about the meaning and power of these works?
  • Is a computer screen the right frame for a painting?
  • What is it that you can learn about a work of art when you’re able to magnify each of those individual elements and does it reach a point that’s sort of too much? …Is Google bringing us too close to art?
  • We pay a lot of attention… in museums as to how artists want their works displayed. Does that simply go out the window when it comes to digital reproduction?
  • …(If) the digital experience or the online experience, the at-home experience, becomes every bit as or perhaps more satisfying in some ways than going to a museum, do you…worry that the business model behind the presentation of art in museums could be dismantled?[/li]
    [li]Do any of you have concerns that that experience of visiting the artwork…is at all diminished by the free availability of these images?

Check out the archived broadcast for yourself to hear how Dueker, Goodyear, and Green deftly tackled each one.

The Kojo Nnamdi Show (June 25, 2013)
A Masterwork on Your Screen: Museums Digitize Collections
Listen | Read transcript

Note: Collage created from a high-res download (freely available at NGA Images) of Vincent van Gogh’s Self-Portrait, (1889).