Hangout with Art

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I’m taking part in the Milwaukee Art Museum’s “Hangout with Art” online course. Unlike other MOOCs I have participated in (e.g., MoMA’s “Art and Inquiry” on Coursera), this one relies on Twitter and Google+ for sharing and discussion. I felt like I needed more space for my assignments and a “home” for them . . . hence this blog post.

What museums need to know about Google Play for Education

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Last week during their annual developer-focused conference, Google provided a first glimpse of Google Play for Education. While coverage in education and tech blogs has focused on what this new development could mean for teachers and school administrators, I wanted to provide a quick guide for those of us in museum education. What does this mean for our work with teachers and students? And how can museums play a role in providing quality educational content?

What is Google Play for Education?

  • An app store for educators. The store (to be launched this fall) will make it easy to search, download, and deploy apps and other K-12 learning content to multiple (Android) tablet devices.
  • An iPad killer? Bulk ordering for groups means that schools can easily purchase and instantly distribute content to student devices. Because of this simplicity, and more affordable hardware, some are already saying Google Play for Education will kill iPad use in schools.
  • Content for educators, reviewed and approved by educators. Educators will be able to search by category, grade level, and other criteria. Educators will review content submitted to Google Play for Education and categorize them with Common Core Standards. Teachers will be able to read app reviews by other teachers and share their own recommendations.

Why does this matter for museum education?

  • More platforms for content. If Google Play for Education takes off, it will have big implications for museums in terms of the platforms we use for creating digital learning content, including lesson plans, activities, and apps. Many content producers have been publishing in iBook or iOS apps and will need to more seriously consider developing Android apps. Google has already recruited NASA and PBS as content partners. How can museums work with Google to create high-quality content for these platforms?
  • It’s not just about iPad or Android apps. Teachers will be able to push out YouTube videos to students in the same way they can apps. Now is a good time to review our strategies for creating video and other multimedia content for this audience. It is also a good time to look at Chrome apps and HTML5 for delivering rich mobile content on the web that is device agnostic.
  • Professional development for educators. Teacher training will be essential to effective integration of tablets and digital content in the classroom. How can museum educators play a role in this training?

What do you think about this new development in K-12 education? How might your museum take advantage of this opportunity?

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